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  Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society

Thursday July 2, 2020  7:00 pm

Presented by Greg Starr
"New or Reconsidered Agave species Post Gentry"

Note this is a Virtual Meeting using Zoom conferencing technology>

No meetings at Sky Islands High School are currently being planned due to Covid-19 concerns


You can view the July meeting with the aid of your cell phone, tablet. ipad, laptop or desktop computer, you will enjoy an excellent program!

There will be a Q&A period at the end using written Chat questions, you do not need a microphone

Please see our Zoom Instructions for connection and how to use Zoom.
 


In 1982, Howard Scott Gentry produced the most comprehensive monograph titled, Agaves of Continental North America. Gentry was an intrepid explorer and collector, spending over 30 years studying the genus in addition to his primary research on the genus Phaseolus for the USDA. Agaves have become quite popular both scientifically and with more exploration of Mexico and the southwestern U.S., there have been many new discoveries. In fact, in the 38 years since the publication of Agaves of Continental North America, there has been so much activity surrounding the genus that 52 species plus 3 subspecies have either been newly discovered or reevaluated. For example, in the “group” Striatae, Gentry listed three species, Agave dasylirioides, Agave striata, and Agave stricta. That number currently stands at 11 species with potentially more on the horizon. Much of this is due to new roads opening areas that were previously nearly impossible to access. Sometimes, a species complex has been reevaluated and species names previously considered synonyms of another name are now considered valid. For example, Gentry considered Agave kerchovei to be a highly variable, polymorphic species and included five other names as synonyms. Further investigation has revealed that two of those names are distinct entities and have been elevated back to species status.
   
Greg has had a long-standing interest in the genus Agave both horticulturally and botanically. He has been growing agaves at his nursery since opening the doors in 1985 and has authored or coauthored 5 species and 1 subspecies. He described Agave ovatifolia in 2002 along with co-author José Angel Villarreal who had previously described Agave montana. More recently Greg has authored or coauthored Agave azurea, Agave calciphila, Agave cremnophila, Agave oteroi, and Agave parviflora subsp. densiflora. This brand-new presentation of Greg’s will delve into some of the newly described species and some of the reconsidered names. He will take the mystery out of some of these new species and address controversy surrounding others. If you like agaves, there are now even more to like, so come on out and find a new favorite.
  

Agave montana

Agave montana

 

Agave azurea

Agave azurea


Agave calciphila

Agave calciphila


Agave oteroi

Agave oteroi 


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TCSS reserves the right to change dates and/or program should it be necessary.